Special Thanks to NASP Detroit & Founder’s Brewing Co.

We’d like to extend a special thanks to the National Association of Securities Professionals (NASP) Detroit and Founder’s Brewing Co. for sponsoring the Move The World Exhibition and it’s programs.

NASP joined us for two special events and – as an organization dedicated to helping minorities to achieve equality and inclusion in the financial securities industry – some of their members shared these thoughts on the importance of art, collecting, and investing:

Thank you for your votes of confidence in our work!

Move The World LIVE ART Closing Reception

SATURDAY, MAY 1, 2021 — Irwin House Gallery will host an Outdoor/Indoor Closing Event for its current exhibition, Move The World. Activities will take place outside, on the gallery grounds, with (limited) open access to the gallery to view and enjoy the last day of the exhibition.

The FREE event will feature music by DJ Deadphone, a performance by the exhibition’s Poet Laureate, Brittini Ward, and LIVE ART being created on site by a team of local Detroit artists including: Allen Williams, Cameron Jenkins, Demien DeYonte, Errin Whitaker, Hosanna Kline, Kayla Childress, Kirah Price, Maliek Phillips, Nonnie Williams, Oscar Lopez, Scott McDuffee, Warren Wells, and ZurixZuri.

The Live Art being created on-site will become part of a semi-permanent outdoor installation, entitled Heart, to be unveiled later in the month along West Grand Blvd., at the gallery site.

Move The World Curator’s Talk with Omo Misha 4/29 | Detroit Public Library

A Curator’s talk with Omo Misha with special performance by the exhibition’s Poet Laureate, Brittini Ward

About this event

Irwin House Gallery Director and Curator, Omo Misha, discusses the art and artists of Move The World – the gallery’s current exhibition celebrating ‘the extraordinary lives of ordinary sisters and queens’. The exhibition, which ran through Black and Women’s History Months and has been extended through May 1st, has been inspired by the recent political and professional contributions of Black women, and explores the everyday strengths, triumphs, and traumas of Black girl and womanhood through paintings and mixed-media fine artworks, photography, fiber art, installation, and spoken word. Featured Detroit and visiting artists include: Jide Aje, Ricky Weaver, Jonathan Harris, Damien Mathis, BAI, Laura Gadson, Donn Thompson, and Geoffrey Holder.

REGISTER HERE

How these Black women curators are empowering artists… | Model D Media

How these Black women curators are empowering artists to tell their own stories

Move The World: Meet Poet Laureate, Brittini Ward

Brittini Ward is a Detroit emerging visual artist, writer, and content-producer. She describes herself as “an old soul at heart, a spiritual being, healer, lightworker, backed by her ancestors, guided by the spirit, and loved by God.” Her hope is that her poetry and art will connect to and awaken hearts and minds or highlight perspectives that need to be told. Brittini received an Emmy Award for her poem ‘Passion Towards Purpose” and received the Kwaanza S.A. Committee Unity Award in 2017. Ward acquired a degree in Professional Communications and Graphic Design from University of Michigan, Flint, where she also “found her voice” through involvement with the Black Student Union. Soon after graduating, she joined AmeriCorp for two years and impacted young lives through mentorship in San Antonio, TX. Brittini Ward went on to receive a Graduate Degree from Ann Prescott College in Arizona, where she participated in a program that involved social justice work throughout the world. As Poet Laureate of “Move The World” Brittini’s poetic expressions address women’s, current, and black cultural concerns, and provide a soundscape for the exhibited art.

VIEW MORE AND FULL EXHIBITION CATALOG HERE.

Move The World: Meet Yasmine Lancaster @youwannatellher

“The origins of YouWannaTellHer Instagram page began as a promotional page for a visual project of men reading a collection of poems I wrote that explore the subject of Love, and all its incarnations. Because I am a writer  and IG is a visual medium, it wasn’t enough for me to simply post the photographs – I also intended to explore the idea and feelings that the photographs evoked through text. Sometimes the point of view is that of a man expressing his feelings, other times it’s a woman. However, all begin with the tag line “YouWannaTellHer”. The page has evolved over the years: Initially being a page that highlighted all women, very quickly, within weeks, the post began to highlight Black Women across time and space – from West Africa to the Bronx. My aim with this page is to show the complexity, the beauty, the sensuality, sexuality,  victories won and the crushing injustices experienced. It’s my hope that my page can add a layer to the visual representation of Black Women to highlight our complexity and move beyond stereotypical depictions. I am in love with Black Women because I am a Black Woman and if you feel the same way I do go ahead and tell her. She needs to hear that declaration.” – Yasmine Lancaster

VIEW FULL EXHIBITION CATALOG HERE.

Move The World: Meet Artist, Laura Gadson

This work was created in celebration of the 40th anniversary of For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide / When the Rainbow Is Enuf, Ntozake Shange’s first work and most acclaimed theater piece, which premiered in 1976. For Colored Girls consists of a series of poetic monologues accompanied by dance and music, a form Shange coined as the choreopoem. The piece is a series of 20 separate poems choreographed to music that weaves interconnected stories of love, empowerment, struggle and loss into a complex representation of sisterhood. The original cast consists of seven nameless African-American women only identified by the colors they are assigned: They are the Lady in Red, Lady in Orange, Lady in Yellow, Lady in Green, Lady in Blue, Lady in Brown, and Lady in Purple. Subjects from rape, abandonment, abortion and domestic violence are tackled.

This artwork illustrates the poem of the Lady in Orange, who reflects on her life as a dancer, the music and experiences that brought her joy, and the heartbreak that ensued. It has exhibited at the Schomburg Center in Harlem, NY, the Houston Museum of African American Culture, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art as part of the exhibition, I Found God in Myself exhibition, curated by Peter “Souleo” Wright in commemoration of Shange’s seminal work.


Quilt, fiber, and mixed media artist Laura R. Gadson explores and often blends the worlds of quilting, felting, painting, collage and Fine Art as a result of her love affair with textiles, paper, and mixed materials.
  She is a graduate of the renowned Fiorello LaGuardia High School of Music and holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the City College of New York. Her work has been widely exhibited, reproduced as public art in her community, and is proudly part of various public and notable private collections, including the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. She is co-founder of the Harlem Aesthetic –  an entrepreneurial venture that showcases artist and artisans of the African Diaspora at the Gadson Gallery” – her Harlem, NY brownstone, studio, and personal show place since 1993.

VIEW FULL EXHIBITION CATALOG HERE.

Move The World: Geoffrey Holder

Untitled (Seated Nude) circa 1960. 30 x 40 inches. Oil on cotton canvas. NFS (From the collection of Carl McCaskill, NY)

Geoffrey Holder (1930-2014), the dancer, choreographer, actor, composer, and designer used his manifold talents to infuse the arts with the flavor of his native West Indies and to put a singular stamp on the American cultural scene.

Despite an illustrious career in the performing arts, painting was a constant for Holder, who lived and created in the New York City loft he shared with his wife, Carmen de Lavallade.  He absorbed himself in developing work that drew on folk tales and often delivered biting social commentary. On canvases throughout the studio, sensuous nudes jostled for space with elegantly dressed women, ghostly swimmers nestled beside black Virgin Marys, bulky strippers seemed to burst out of their skins, and mysterious figures peered out of tropical forests. Like many fine artists, he was inspired by the female form, informed by his personal experience with the body as an art-form,  and, especially inspirited by his beautiful wife, Carmen.

His work was shown at the Corcoran Gallery in Washington and at the Guggenheim Museum in New York. The multi-talented Holder was also a photographer and his sculptor.

VIEW FULL EXHIBITION CATALOG HERE.

Move The World: Meet Artist, Jide Aje

Nigerian-born Jide Aje pays homage to the goddesses of his native Yoruba culture through this mixed media composition combining traditional African motifs, ceremonial sculptures, and layers of textured pigment. Each Orisa, or deity in Yoruba religion, represents particular ideas, objects or natural phenomena. Aje’s panels are imbued with the spirit of female deities, who are believed to preside over healing, wealth, air, love, fertility, the sun and moon, and magic.

Jide Aje was educated in Nigeria and the United States. After earning a Fine Art degree from the University of Ife, Ile-Ife Nigeria, he relocated to the United States to pursue a career in the creative design field. His first show in the area was with the Redd Apple Gallery, Detroit in 2004. He is an active member of several local arts and cultural organizations. This artist’s studio is currently based in the City of Hamtramck, Michigan.

VIEW THE FULL EXHIBITION CATALOG HERE.

‘Move The World’ Art Exhibit Celebrates The Lives of Black Women | HOUR Detroit


‘Move The World’ Art Exhibit Celebrates The Lives of Black Women

Check out work by both local and visiting artists at Detroit’s Irwin House Gallery
“Paroxysm,” acrylic, copper leaf on canvas, 36 x 72 inches (diptych), by Dawn Okoro

Irwin House Global Art Center & Gallery is celebrating the lives of everyday Black women with its latest exhibit, Move The World. The exhibit — which debuted in mid-February and runs through the end of March in honor of Black History and Women’s History Months — features work by both local and visiting artists. CLICK HERE TO READ MORE…